Thursday, February 05, 2009

A fine balance

It is often difficult to stay away from saying things that are stereotypical. Or thinking it, for that matter. Especially when it comes to a particular race. Growing up in Dubai, I'd often hear my parents talk about workplace politics that involved a particular race (let's call them Race X from now on) and try as they might to avoid it, the inevitable common thread always revealed itself. Years later I now find myself working with Race X and so far I have been great at keeping the stereotypical thoughts at bay, especially considering I myself belong to a particular race. Until recently, that is. That common thread with Race X has not only revealed itself, but it has begun to fray, making it very difficult to keep an open mind while I work with this particular group of people. While from their perspective it may seem that this particular trait might be harmless, it is one that seems to be creating obstacles at work and negatively affecting workplace efficiency. I can now understand the government’s motives on placing restrictions on whichever expatriate race it is that is found on any given island in large numbers all in the name of wanting to promote a social balance.

3 comments:

bermudabluez said...

I agree with you. It's pretty much the same all over...

fortyfiveminutes said...

From a government's perspective, race, like religion, would be too discriminatory a tool to regulate migration, and, subsequently, social balance with. They would be more likely to place migration restrictions based on the country you were trying to migrate from because irrespective of your race, the place you have lived in the longest would be most likely to influence your social/societal habits that may eventually promote, maintain or ruin the balance you speak of.

MS CUTE PANTS said...

I agree with you FF and your comment definitely applies to countries like Canada, US, England< Australia and the like.

This post is actually related to expat guest workers, whose stay here is temporary & limited to about seven years. There are very slim changes of expat workers achieving migratory status unless they marry locals and it is this that the government is trying to limit in order to promote a fine balance, temporary as it may be. Quite crucial in this regard, I think.